This F-4 Phantom Supersonic Fighter-Jet most likely served with the U.S. Navy and is probably an F-4B, J or N model. The Phantom’s intact condition and various missing components suggest it didn’t crash or ditch. During the Vietnam War it wasn’t uncommon for badly damaged aircrafts to be stripped for parts and, in some cases, even pushed overboard to free up space.

The F-4 Phantom Jet dive site is located just outside the mouth, South of Subic Bay. The site contains the remains (basically only the airframe) of the aircraft, and its believed that the plane was stripped of all mechanical and electrical parts before being pushed off a US aircraft carrier sometime during the Vietnam War. This wreck is located at a depth of 44-45 meters so you’re required to hold at least Tec-45 before conducting a dive with us at this site.

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber originally developed for the U.S. Navy by McDonnell Aircraft. Proving highly adaptable, it became a major part of the air wings of the United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force. It was used extensively by all three of these services during the Vietnam War, serving as the principal air superiority fighter for both the Navy and Air Force, as well as being important in the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles by the close of U.S. involvement in the war.

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber originally developed for the United States Navy by McDonnell Aircraft. It first entered service in 1960 with the U.S. Navy. Proving highly adaptable, it was also adopted by the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Air Force, and by the mid-1960s had become a major part of their respective air wings. The Phantom is a large fighter with a top speed of over Mach 2.2. It can carry over 18,000 pounds (8,400 kg) of weapons on nine external hard-points, including air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles, and various bombs. The F-4, like other interceptors of its time, was designed without an internal cannon, but later models incorporated a M61 Vulcan rotary cannon. Beginning in 1959, it set 15 world records, including an absolute speed record, and an absolute altitude record.

The F-4 was used extensively during the Vietnam War, serving as the principal air superiority fighter for both the Navy and Air Force, as well as being important in the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles by the close of U.S. involvement in the war. The Phantom has the distinction of being the last U.S. fighter flown to attain ace status in the 20th century. During the Vietnam War, the USAF had one pilot and two weapon systems officers (WSOs), and the US Navy one pilot and one radar intercept officer (RIO), achieve five aerial kills against other enemy fighter aircraft and become aces in air-to-air combat. The F-4 continued to form a major part of U.S. military air power throughout the 1970s and 1980s, being gradually replaced by more modern aircraft such as the F-15 Eagle and F-16 in the U.S. Air Force; the Grumman F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Hornet in the U.S. Navy; and the F/A-18 in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Videoclip from the F-4 Phantom site

 Coordinates:

  • Latitude: 14.692139633680520
  • Longitude: 120.2154922485351
  • Copy and paste in Google Maps to view the location; 14.692139633680520, 120.2154922485351  (Google Maps)

 

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